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1002:tutorial:3 [2019/08/18 17:27]
ryans
1002:tutorial:3 [2019/08/18 17:32] (current)
ryans
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 3. Davis-Floyd argues that US hospital births as rituals use symbols of medicine and professional expertise to express the idea that the body of the mother is only valuable as a source of life for the baby. Many of the people she interviewed describe how the hospital equipment and routines seemed to detach women from their own bodies and from the experience of birth itself. One woman even described how doctors and nurses focused on the monitors to which she was connected, as if the machine was giving birth and not her (Davis-Floyd 1994, 333). 3. Davis-Floyd argues that US hospital births as rituals use symbols of medicine and professional expertise to express the idea that the body of the mother is only valuable as a source of life for the baby. Many of the people she interviewed describe how the hospital equipment and routines seemed to detach women from their own bodies and from the experience of birth itself. One woman even described how doctors and nurses focused on the monitors to which she was connected, as if the machine was giving birth and not her (Davis-Floyd 1994, 333).
  
-4. In her study of hospital births in the US, Davis-Floyd notes that many of medical routines of delivery are based on the metaphor of the woman'​s body as a machine. For example, one medical resident she interviewed said that it was "hard not to see it as an assembly line." What this resident observes was that doctors are trained to see every birth as the same, and treat every delivery exactly the same way. I believe this demonstrates that the birth process, as a symbolic statement, ​expresses ​the control of nature through science ​is a cultural ideal.+4. In her study of hospital births in the US, Davis-Floyd notes that many of medical routines of delivery are based on the metaphor of the woman'​s body as a machine. For example, one medical resident she interviewed said that it was "hard not to see it as an assembly line." What this resident observes was that doctors are trained to see every birth as the same, and treat every delivery exactly the same way. I believe this demonstrates that the birth process, as a symbolic statement, ​represents ​the control of nature through science ​as a cultural ideal.
  
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1002/tutorial/3.txt · Last modified: 2019/08/18 17:32 by ryans